Tag Archives: jewellery

Lola Loves… A good old handmade wedding

There have been weddings galore within my circle of friends recently. We’re at the age that we’ve started, couple by couple, to realise we’re now adults and should grow up accordingly.

The latest wedding belonged to a couple I’ve already blogged about. They had a formal wedding earlier in the year (remember, I made this blanket for them?). This time they had a pagan wedding blessing festival for friends – and flipping amazing it was too. Here’s a pic of the lovely couple.

The happy couple at their crafty wedding

The happy couple at their crafty wedding

It was a very crafty affair. Claire, the brains and beauty behind the pretty vintage dress company, Prince Lilly, refashioned the bride’s dress into something even more stunning than it already was (the fur stole became a trim at the base of the dress and she added tiny handmade fabric roses and feather tufts).

Two other slices of genius in female form, Margarida and Elsbeth, made some of the most special cupcakes I’ve ever seen (my boyfriend got so excited about these that he stole a ‘midnight-snack stash’ and smuggled them to our room in a tea towel. Don’t worry, I told him off for it – before snaffling two in a row!).

The theme of the wedding was a suitable pagan ‘four elements’, so Margarita and Elsbeth made four types of cake, my faves were the carrot cupcakes, which were decorated with icing sugar foliage and bugs representing earth and chilli-chocolate cupcakes, adorned with fire-breathing dragons.

The bride spent hours making  amazing four elements masks, which everyone wore during the ceremony.

The fur stole was sewn onto the trim of the wedding dress to make a trail

The fur stole was sewn onto the trim of the wedding dress to make a trail

One of the amazing masks, which the Bride hand-crafted

One of the amazing masks, which the Bride hand-crafted

Two of the delicious homemade cupcakes

Two of the delicious homemade cupcakes

Obviously, I didn’t want to be left out of the craft fun. I did my bit during the day by styling the bride’s hair (why she let me, I still don’t know) but beforehand I made these crafty gifts. I gave the bride a dual-pendant necklace, the groom a pair of cufflinks, and each of them a keyring. They are really just a bit of fun and a memento of their first and official wedding, when they chose 80s comic book character, Lion-O, and Star Wars’ Princess Leia as wedding cake toppers.

The bride and groom's first wedding cake and toppers

The bride and groom’s first wedding cake and toppers

Crafty handmade cufflinks using polymer clay and resin

Crafty handmade cufflinks using polymer clay

Lion-O and Leia pendants made with polymer clay and resin

Lion-O and Leia pendants made with polymer clay and resin

Handmade and personalised keyrings made with polymer clay and resin

Handmade and personalised keyrings made with polymer clay and resin

Handmade gift boxes

Handmade gift boxes

Cross stitched personalised sampler wedding card

Cross stitched personalised sampler wedding card

I also handmade the card boxes using a template I found here. I secured it with a bit of garden sting and some oh-so-cute ribbon that was free on the cover of Mollie Makes (issue 15).  I also stitched a wedding sampler and made it into a wedding card

Tomorrow, I’ll post on the fascinator I made for the wedding day. And in the meantime, I’ll think of what to make for the wedding next month – any ideas?

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Lola loves… making rings!

I have a bit of a thing for rings. I change mine everyday and I’m always on the look out for more. It’s an expensive habit so making them is that bit more rewarding.

This black asymmetric ring was easy, if a bit fiddly to make. Here’s how I did it…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I primed a piece of black polymer clay, warming and rolling it until it was malleable. (I wrapped the rest of the clay in cling film to stay soft). I then cut a quarter of it and rolled it to 2mm thick. I then cut a strip and wrapped it around my finger, slid it off and smoothed the edges. I then baked it at 150C for 30 mins. This gave me the ring base from which I could sculpt the finished project.

Once cool, I primed the rest of the clay and worked it into a rectangle and smoothed that on to the base ring. Using a sharp scalpel  blade I cut the clay at irregular angles and then worked it smooth with my fingers and the flat surface of a table.

I then baked it again at 150C for 30 mins.

Obviously, once you’ve done the base, you can create any shape and chose any colour. I know I’ll be coming back to do more as I’ve already worn this ring lots!


Lola loves… to make jewellery!

Hey fellow bloggers! Today’s post is a bit of a deviation — usually I offer a ‘how to’ on my craft projects but this time I’m keeping schtum as I’m planning to sell some of these in the near future (no one likes to kill the mystery!

So this is basically just a show and tell of some of the things I’ve been up to. It’d be great to hear what you think and whether you would wear any of these! (p.s. please excuse the lairy pink in the ‘photo shoot’, I’ll try harder next time!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Lola loves… Crafty Estonia!

Hey peeps! Well, I’m back from my business trip to Tallinn, Estonia. It turns out those button chairs I posted about were just a hint of the cool things you can find there and I’ve been busting to tell you all about it!

Tallinn is a mecca for crafting, its specialties are amber jewellery, wood-work, felting and knitting.

In just a few hours off to look around, I found everything from hand-carved wooden spoons to felted jewellery and knitted wooly socks. The best however, were giant doilies that’d be great as rugs (I really wish I’d bought one!)

Another thing I wish I’d bought was this gorgeous printed cross-stitch apron.

But, I did manage to bag some pretty crafty finds, some of which I’m sure you’ll see in future projects.

 


 

 

 

1. Felted blanket stitch soles — I’ll use these to make slippers for my fella, 2. Buttons in Juniper and Apple wood, 3. Cinnamon honey — as delicious in coffee as it is on toast, 4. Russian style stacking dolls — great to store jewellery findings.

Tallinn is small but beautiful; its architecture is backlit by blue skies (it was only dark for around four hours each night while we were there) and its history gives it an intriguing personality.

Estonia is similar in many ways to its Baltic neighbours yet its occupancy by Soviet Russia during World War II also had a profound effect. This is clear in its architecture and history books; 25% of Estonians died during the Nazi regime, more than any other country in Europe.

The Estonian Museum of Occupations in Tallinn, charts all this through video and found objects. It’s a great way to understand the history of the country and the effect of the Nazi regime on smaller countries often overlooked. Separate to this important message, I found the exhibition very interesting in terms of 1940s and 1950s design and thought I’d share a a few of the photos I took   

1. Local propaganda magazine from the 40s, 2. A prison door with Russian writing, 3. Suitcases of those killed by Nazis, 4. A very intriguing telephone, (unfortunately little was said about this. Why no buttons? Was is a prototype? Did it only call one person, and who?) A telephone box with Russian writing.


Lola loves… Easy to make polymer clay brooches

Whoop, I’ve rediscovered polymer clay and I feel like a kid again! Here’s one of many bits I’ve been working on…

To make this skull brooch, I pressed polymer clay into an ice cube tray and baked on a low heat. It’s as simple as that, but before you try it yourself here’s a few tips.

What you will need:
Silicone ice cube tray (or mould specifically for polymer clay)
Polymer clay (I used Fimo in pearlised white)
Varnish, clear nail varnish will do — optional
Brooch fitting
Felt
Glue (I used two-part resin, Araldite)
Cutting mat
Rotary trimmer

Tips for using polymer clay:

  • Warm the clay by rubbing between your palms first — this will make it more pliable.
  • Push the clay into any cracks of your mould and smooth over using an orange stick (or cuticle stick).
  • If you’re using an ice cube tray, don’t fill the mould all the way — unless you want a very thick brooch!
  • Check that your ice cube tray is okay to use in the oven. Be warned crafters, not all that bends is silicone — and if it’s not silicone it’ll melt when you cook it! (As I’ve found out myself!) Check the pack but if you’re not sure, bend it — if it looks clear or looses colour it isn’t silicone and is likely to melt.
  • If you’re careful you can use the ice cube tray as a mould, turning out the clay before cooking.
  • To harden the clay, cook on 110C/ 230F for 30 minutes and leave it to cool.
  • I prefer the matte effect but once cool you can varnish it. Fimo produces its own hardening varnish, though other crafters often use clear nail varnish to the same effect.

Once finished, I attached the brooch back and covered the reverse side in felt. Here’s how to do this bit:

  • Place the skull on top of felt and place both on your cutting mat. Trim round the skull using your rotary trimmer (or scalpel blade) so you have a piece of felt the same size as the brooch.
  • Cut two small holes large enough for the hinge and clasp of the brooch to fit through.
  • Pass the brooch back through the holed felt and stick both to the reverse side of the skull. Clamp with clothing pegs and leave to dry.

 

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Lola loves… DIY fabric jewellery

Remember this ring I blogged about a while ago? I told you I’d post about how I made it. Well, it’s been a while but here it is.

Making these fabric jewellery pieces feels a little bit like magic. You can use any image you like so long as its laser printed onto paper. The best bit is that the process can be used for all sorts of projects so you can create customised fabric either to frame or use for your next sewing project.

Because of the process involved, the fabric ends up a little like waxed fabric, which means it’s great for items that need to be wiped clean like table runners or make-up bags.

Here’s a few more I made using the same process…

What you will need:

An image laser printed onto paper (it must be laser printed, not ink or it won’t work)
A scrap of fabric
Acrylic gel medium (you can find this online, or in art supply shops)
A paint brush
Ring / brooch findings (see picture, right)
Fabric scissors
Pliers
A needle and thread
Water

Using a laser jet printer, print your chosen image onto paper. Make sure that the image is slightly smaller than the findings (see above). I chose circular findings for the ring and larger oval findings for the brooch but you will find lots to choose from at craft or jewellery stores, or online.

Paint the printed image generously with gel medium and lay it face down on a scrap of fabric. Pat down to get out any air bubbles or creases. (Make sure to wash your brush quickly or the gel medium will dry and be hard to get off.) Hang the fabric pieces up to dry for 24 hours.

Once they are fully dry, wet the paper and carefully peel it off the fabric. The best way to do this is to rub it with you fingertips but be gentle around the edges as the gel, not just the paper, may start to lift.

As you remove the paper you will see your image imprinted on the hard layer of gel.

Make sure all the paper is off. As the paper is wet it may be hard to see and you might find that once your fabric is dry there is still a little paper left. If so, repeat the process.

Once all the paper is off, hang your fabric to dry. Once dry, paint it with another layer of gel medium – this time thin – and hang to dry again.

Now that you have your bespoke fabric, it’s time to make the jewellery.

Simply stretch the fabric over the disc section of the jewellery finding making sure that the image is well centered. Trim any excess fabric and secure at the back with a few stitches. You will find that the gel has made the fabric stiff, which may create corners instead of smooth edges. Add a few stitches here to smooth these out.

Next, pop the disc onto the back piece of the finding (the ring or brooch base) and press the teeth down with pliers. Enjoy your new jewellery!


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